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New Report Highlights PTSD Risk Factors in Women Veterans

  • Wounded Warrior discusses the relationship between MST and PTSD
    Wounded Warrior discusses the relationship between MST and PTSD

JACKSONVILLE, Fla., June 25, 2021 /PRNewswire/ -- A special report from Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) shows that women warriors who experienced military sexual trauma (MST) are nearly three times as likely to experience moderate to severe symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), compared to women warriors who did not experience MST.

The research is presented in a WWP white paper, Women Warriors: Understanding PTSD Risk in a Rapidly Growing Population. With PTSD Awareness Month in June, WWP is analyzing the risk factors that contribute to PTSD symptoms in women veterans registered with WWP. Women represent the fastest growing segment of the veteran population and experience unique challenges, including higher rates of MST than men.

In addition to MST, the research focuses on the impacts of co-occurring mental health challenges and combat experience. The analysis also examines how readily women warriors can access mental health care and concludes that nearly half of women warriors with PTSD experience challenges.

WWP provides mental health and wellness programs that break down barriers to care and help women warriors cope with PTSD and trauma like MST. For example, WWP partners with four world-renowned academic medical centers to form Warrior Care Network®. This program provides lifesaving, clinical mental health care for veterans managing PTSD, traumatic brain injury (TBI), and other combat stress. Since the inception of Warrior Care Network, nearly 500 women have benefited from intensive outpatient treatment, with one-third being treated through MST cohorts.

Learn about the services provided by Warrior Care Network.

"Women warriors have unique needs," said Dr. Melanie Mousseau, WWP vice president of program operations and partnerships. "As the population of women veterans grows, it is critical that we understand those needs and support women with programs to take care of their mental health."

In addition to Warrior Care Network, WWP offers other mental health programs to assist women warriors in their journeys to recovery. The nonprofit also developed the Women Warriors Initiative to better understand, empower, and advocate for women warriors.

About Wounded Warrior Project
Since 2003, Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) has been meeting the growing needs of warriors, their families, and caregivers — helping them achieve their highest ambition. Learn more.

A special report from Wounded Warrior Project highlights risk factors that contribute to PTSD symptoms in women veterans, including military sexual trauma (MST) and co-occurring mental health challenges.

 

Wounded Warrior Project(R)

SOURCE Wounded Warrior Project

For further information: Jon Blauvelt -- Public Relations, jblauvelt@woundedwarriorproject.org, 904.426.9756