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Warriors Discover New Resilience at Adaptive Sports Clinic

SACRAMENTO, Calif., Jan. 2, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- After 22 years in the Marine Corps, not much intimidates David Field. David, who uses a wheelchair, recently participated in a Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) adaptive sports clinic where he tried basketball, tennis, boccia ball, and powerlifting.

Wounded Warriors show their strength at Adaptive Sports Clinic

"I have mobility issues because of ALS," David explained. "I use a wheelchair 80 percent – almost 90 percent of the time. The adaptive sports clinic allowed me to try boccia ball and basketball for the first time from the wheelchair."

David said he would recommend a WWP adaptive sports clinic to other warriors. "Many people get depressed because of disability," he said. "This gets you out and active. It helps you realize there's more out there than sitting at home."

The wildfires that raged through California in the past months, and the resulting air pollution, almost interfered with the adaptive sports clinic. Luckily, WWP staff, working with Sacramento State University and the City of Sacramento, found alternative locations.

James Davis appreciated the collaboration on behalf of the warriors. The Army veteran uses a wheelchair because of limited mobility on one side of his body. "It's good to get out and talk with other disabled veterans," James said. "I made important connections with other warriors and with adaptive sports specialists."

After the fast turnaround to make new arrangements, James and the rest of the group were able to try indoor boccia ball and wheelchair tennis. "Being physically disabled, there are a lot of things doctors tell you that you cannot do," James said. "Trying new things is always fun. Being with other veterans is comforting and allows you to share more about your experiences."

WWP exposes wounded warriors to adaptive sports to help them gain confidence and knowledge of what's available. Many are encouraged to continue participating in adaptive sports on their own. David said he plans to try downhill skiing on an adaptive bike outfitted with skis.

Learn about WWP's other free wellness opportunities, in-person and online classes, coaching, and health clinics for warriors and caregivers at https://wwp.news/WWP.

About Wounded Warrior Project
Since 2003, Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) has been meeting the growing needs of warriors, their families, and caregivers – helping them achieve their highest ambition. Learn more: http://newsroom.woundedwarriorproject.org/about-us.

Wounded Warrior Project is recognizing 15 years of impactful programs and services. Independence Program helps seriously injured warriors live more meaningful lives. Learn more at woundedwarriorproject.org. (PRNewsfoto/Wounded Warrior Project)

SOURCE Wounded Warrior Project

For further information: Vesta M. Anderson, Public Relations, vanderson@woundedwarriorproject.org, 904.570.0771