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JACKSONVILLE, Fla., Oct. 11, 2021 — Each year Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) hosts a special celebration to showcase warriors' transitions to civilian life and recognize supporters that honor...

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Adaptive Physical Health, Wellness Clinic Helps Local Injured Veterans

ATLANTA, April 10, 2018 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Injured veterans from across the region recently attended a three-day Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) Physical Health and Wellness clinic in Atlanta. The clinic kick-started a 90-day educational coaching program that focuses on meeting health goals set by warriors with the greatest physical needs, such as obesity and high body mass index. The program also helps warriors meet goals relating to nutrition, mobility, and mental wellness.

Physical Health, Wellness Clinic Helps Local Injured Veterans

WWP's Physical Health and Wellness program clinics are designed to reduce stress, combat depression, and promote an overall healthy and active lifestyle.

Warriors were tested for range of motion and learned about adaptive exercises. A sports nutritionist taught proper nutrition and hydration, and the clinic experience was rounded out with a Total Body Resistance Exercise (TRX) workout demo.  

"The clinic showed me that I can still move forward in life despite my limitations due to my physical and mental conditions," said Ed Santiago, U.S. Army injured veteran from Atlanta, Georgia. "I used to limit myself in fear of getting hurt or making my injuries worse – I used it as an excuse to stay in my comfort zone – but the clinic left me super motivated and committed to keep moving forward to enhance my physical, mental, and nutritional life."

In a WWP survey of the injured warriors it serves, 30.3 percent of survey respondents expressed physical activity helps them cope with stress and emotional concerns.

"The invisible wounds of war have greatly affected my life," Ed said. "I find myself missing being over there in a combat zone – I became adapted to the stress, exposure to danger, noise, explosions, and anxiety. It's hard to get back to normal when your normal becomes the worst place to ever be."

Thanks to generous donors, these WWP gatherings support the long-term recovery needs of warriors by reintroducing them to the bonds experienced during military service.

"It was great to share with other warriors with similar and different limitations," Ed said. "Their will and commitment to make positive changes in their lives motivated me to do the same."

To learn and see more about how WWP's programs and services connect, serve, and empower wounded warriors, visit our multimedia page.

For further information: Vesta M. Anderson - Public Relations, Email: vanderson@woundedwarriorproject.org, Phone: 904.570.0771