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Injured Veterans Ascend Mount Si on Journey to Recovery

SEATTLE, Aug. 28, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- Nearly a dozen injured veterans ascended Mount Si this week. The summit provided spectacular views of the Cascades and Puget Sound – but more importantly – a unique opportunity for introspection. Many warriors could not help but feel that the long, rocky, and sometimes difficult journey to the summit ridge served as a metaphor describing their personal paths to recovery.

Nearly a dozen injured disabled veterans ascended Mount Si this week. The summit provided spectacular views of the Cascades and Puget Sound – but more importantly – a unique opportunity for introspection. Many warriors could not help but feel that the long, rocky, and sometimes difficult journey to the summit served as a metaphor for their personal paths to recovery.

U.S. Army veteran Terry Rusell endured multiple surgeries, including a below-the-knee amputation last year. He embraced the hiking challenge as another adventure to strengthen body and mind, saying, "It was another stepping stone to living life."

Terry is one of many warriors dealing with physical and mental injuries. In fact, in a Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) survey of the injured veterans it serves, over 80% of warriors report that physical and emotional problems made them less productive. But at WWP events, warriors are introduced to several resources and tools to help them succeed in their recovery goals.

One of the more important aspects of warrior recovery is the connection to other veterans.

"When tackling difficult challenges, warriors draw strength from each other – just like on the battlefield," said Joanna Corp, a WWP Physical Health and Wellness staff member. "The mountain's terrain pushed warriors out of their comfort zones both physically and mentally. As warriors hiked, they shared their thoughts and emotions with each other. We moved forward as one."

The same WWP survey highlights the importance of bonds both during and after service, with more than half of warriors (52.6%) reporting that they talk with fellow veterans to address their mental health concerns. It's the second most cited resource. The fourth highest-ranked resource to improve mental well-being was physical activity at 32.6%.

These types of events are part of WWP's Physical Health and Wellness program, designed to introduce wounded veterans to activities and exercise routines that are specialized and can be adapted to each warrior's unique injury, while promoting an overall healthy and active lifestyle.

Learn more about how veteran programs like this help warriors manage mental health through physical activity and connecting with other veterans.

About Wounded Warrior Project
Since 2003, Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) has been meeting the growing needs of warriors, their families, and caregivers – helping them achieve their highest ambition. Learn more.

 

SOURCE Wounded Warrior Project

For further information: Vesta M. Anderson - Public Relations, vanderson@woundedwarriorproject.org, 904.570.0771

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