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Injured Veterans Discover New Abilities with Wounded Warrior Project

SAN ANTONIO, March 28, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- Army veteran and San Antonio resident Walter Taylor joined other injured veterans from across the country at a Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) adaptive sports clinic in Orlando, Fla.

Wounded Warrior Project - Adaptive Sports Clinic

Walter practiced a skill most of us wouldn't dream of. He can catch approaching balls by sound.

Walter and his team competed against other veterans, many of whom have impaired vision like Walter, and bonded over a game of goalball. Warriors focused on their ear-hand coordination as they caught and passed a rubber ball containing metal bells. The game is played competitively around the world.

Walter served his country as a combat engineer for 12 years and was deployed to Afghanistan and Iraq. In 2011, he was hit in the face by mortar fire that caused burns, vision loss, partial hearing loss, and traumatic brain injury, among other wounds. He endured multiple surgeries and facial reconstructions, spending a year at Landstuhl, Germany, and two and a half years at San Antonio Army Medical Center.

"I was really happy that I got to go to the Wounded Warrior Project adaptive sports clinic," Walter said. "It is one of the best things I ever did. I felt like I was in my element and I could thrive and learn with other veterans."

WWP exposes wounded warriors to adaptive sports to help them gain confidence and knowledge of what's available. Warriors never pay a penny for WWP programs – because they paid their dues on the battlefield.

"I would want other injured veterans to know that Wounded Warrior Project can help you in your recovery process," Walter said. "You meet warriors like you, and the facilitators are amazing – they take time to have a conversation with every warrior and family." 

This clinic was part of WWP's adaptive sports program, designed to connect some of the most seriously wounded veterans with adaptive equipment, sports, and exercise routines that are specialized for each warrior's unique needs.

Learn more about WWP's adaptive sports activities and wellness for warriors and caregivers at https://wwp.news/WWP.

About Wounded Warrior Project
Since 2003, Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) has been meeting the growing needs of warriors, their families, and caregivers – helping them achieve their highest ambition. Learn more: http://newsroom.woundedwarriorproject.org/about-us.

 

SOURCE Wounded Warrior Project

For further information: Vesta M. Anderson - Public Relations, vanderson@woundedwarriorproject.org, 904.570.0771

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