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Warriors Feel Welcomed at Interactive Mystery Dinner

SOMERVILLE, Mass., Oct. 4, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- Injured veterans and their guests attended a Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) connection event at The Dinner Detective, where they enjoyed an evening of intrigue and camaraderie during a murder mystery show.

Warriors attend mystery murder dinner show. Photo courtesy of Dinner Detective Mystery Dinner Show

"A lot of female veterans were at this event," said Air Force veteran Tabitha Barton. "This was a great way to meet new people in the area. I love mingling with everyone."

Socializing with other veterans can help injured warriors cope with stress and emotional concerns. In a WWP survey (https://www.woundedwarriorproject.org/survey) of the injured warriors it serves, more than half of survey respondents (51.6 percent) expressed they talk with fellow veterans to address their mental health issues.
 

Warriors and their guests used their skills of deduction and sleuthing to crack the case during dinner.

"It was great meeting other vets," said National Guard veteran Stephanie Pichette. "The food and show were wonderful, but the best part was feeling welcomed by the couples that sat with us. Usually, we keep to ourselves." 

Isolation is one of the most significant struggles wounded warriors deal with after serving their country. It can be difficult knowing how to overcome that challenge and rekindle bonds similar to those formed in the military.

"Events like this make me feel safe and welcome," Stephanie said. "It's a place where I can be myself; a place where people understand me and respect me even when I'm not feeling that great. One day, when I'm emotionally ready, I hope to go on one of Wounded Warrior Project's more physically challenging events."

WWP program events like this give wounded warriors an opportunity to recharge relationships and experience veteran peer support firsthand. These social gatherings get them out of the house and connect them with their families, fellow service members, and their communities.

WWP has been connecting, serving, and empowering wounded warriors for 15 years. To learn more, visit http://newsroom.woundedwarriorproject.org.

About Wounded Warrior Project
Since 2003, Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) has been meeting the growing needs of warriors, their families, and caregivers – helping them achieve their highest ambition. Learn more: http://newsroom.woundedwarriorproject.org/about-us.

Wounded Warrior Project is recognizing 15 years of impactful programs and services. Independence Program helps seriously injured warriors live more meaningful lives. Learn more at woundedwarriorproject.org. (PRNewsfoto/Wounded Warrior Project)

SOURCE Wounded Warrior Project

For further information: Rob Louis - Public Relations, rlouis@woundedwarriorproject.org, 904.627.0432

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