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Oct 11, 2021

JACKSONVILLE, Fla., Oct. 11, 2021 — Each year Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) hosts a special celebration to showcase warriors' transitions to civilian life and recognize supporters that honor...

Sep 29, 2021

Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) elected new leadership to its volunteer board of directors. Kathleen Widmer is assuming the role of board chair. Lt. Gen. (Ret.) Ken Hunzeker is now vice chair....

Sep 24, 2021

WASHINGTON (Sept. 24, 2021) – Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) applauds the U.S. House passage of legislation that would authorize construction of the Global War on Terrorism Memorial in the...

Veterans Charity Empowers Warriors Through Creative Digital Photography

LONDON, Ohio, May 29, 2018 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Injured veterans discovered the liberating, artistic outlet of digital photography through Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) and Operation Meraki. They felt the power of connecting with art to help cope with their physical and mental wounds of war.

Injured veterans discovered the liberating, artistic outlet of digital photography through Wounded Warrior Project® and Operation Meraki. They felt the power of connecting with art to help cope with their physical and mental wounds of war.

"I'm a writer, and learning another form of expression was appealing," said Marine Corps veteran Christian Bussler. "I enjoyed meeting several warriors, which I think was the most unexpected, yet rewarding, aspect of the class. I felt normal again by spending the day with others who are like me."

"The class gave me a chance to stop taking pictures and start capturing moments of my life," said Air Force veteran Scott Johnson. "They showed me how photography can help me reconnect with the world around me."

WWP program events like this give wounded warriors an opportunity to experience firsthand what is possible at social gatherings that get them out of the house and connect them with fellow service members and their communities.

"I love any opportunity to learn new skills and speak with other veterans who can understand what I've been through," said Air Force veteran Elaine Gooch. "I get a sense of belonging. I can share my insecurities and not feel like I'm being judged. Plus, I got to learn a new hobby."

"As much as I struggle with my severe post-traumatic stress and traumatic brain injury, when I attend events like this, I can't hide, I can't isolate myself, and I have to utilize my coping skills so I can move forward and live a healthier, more stable life," said Army veteran Olena Fergurson. "I refuse to allow my wounds to define me." 

"As I transition through my recovery from post-traumatic stress disorder, Wounded Warrior Project has grown with me," Christian said. "At first, it was an opportunity to leave the confines of my home, but now it's become a track record of the times I overcame the panic attacks. It's my chance to say that life does go on after war."

WWP has been connecting, serving, and empowering wounded warriors for 15 years. To learn more, visit http://newsroom.woundedwarriorproject.org.

About Wounded Warrior Project
Since 2003, Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) has been meeting the growing needs of warriors, their families, and caregivers – helping them achieve their highest ambition. Learn more: http://newsroom.woundedwarriorproject.org/about-us.

 

SOURCE Wounded Warrior Project

For further information: Rob Louis - Public Relations, rlouis@woundedwarriorproject.org, 904.627.0432