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Oct 11, 2021

JACKSONVILLE, Fla., Oct. 11, 2021 — Each year Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) hosts a special celebration to showcase warriors' transitions to civilian life and recognize supporters that honor...

Sep 29, 2021

Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) elected new leadership to its volunteer board of directors. Kathleen Widmer is assuming the role of board chair. Lt. Gen. (Ret.) Ken Hunzeker is now vice chair....

Sep 24, 2021

WASHINGTON (Sept. 24, 2021) – Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) applauds the U.S. House passage of legislation that would authorize construction of the Global War on Terrorism Memorial in the...

Veterans Charity Takes Warriors on Atmospheric Adventure

PERRIS, Calif., April 11, 2018 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Warriors recently took to the skies for a breathtaking view of the California countryside from 4,000 feet up. They bonded with one another on a hot air balloon ride with Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP).

Veterans Charity Takes Warriors on Atmospheric Adventure

Hot air ballooning was the first successful human-carrying flight technology that allowed man to see Earth's beauty from above while experiencing healing freedom of spirit.

"I wanted to attend this event because it was new for my wife and me," said Navy veteran Greg Williams. "The views were amazing, and we conquered our mutual fear of heights through this exciting flight."  

Once in the air, any apprehension warriors may have had seemed to disappear in the wind and was replaced by the silent tranquility of effortless floating.

"I absolutely loved it!" said Navy veteran Abbie Johnson. "It was such an adrenaline rush to be in the open air, so high above the ground, overlooking the mountains of California. My service dog loved it too. It's not every day you get that kind of view."

Activities like hot air ballooning and socializing with other veterans can help injured warriors cope with stress and emotional concerns. In a WWP survey of the injured warriors it serves, more than half of survey respondents (51.6 percent) expressed they talk with fellow veterans to address their mental health issues.

"At this event, I was able to reconnect with a warrior from a diving club I'm part of," Greg said. "Our group thoroughly enjoyed it."

WWP program gatherings offer settings that provide opportunities for injured veterans to form bonds with one another and their communities. WWP also serves warriors by focusing on mental and physical health and wellness, financial wellness, independence, government relations, and community relations and partnerships.

To learn and see more about how WWP's programs and services connect, serve, and empower wounded warriors, visit our multimedia page.

For further information: Rob Louis - Public Relations, rlouis@woundedwarriorproject.org, 904.627.0432