Skip to main content
WWP IMPACT IN ACTION: your support can make a life-changing difference for warriors and their families. LEARN MORE >
Contact Us Español
Latest News
Jun 23, 2022

President Joe Biden and First Lady Dr. Jill Biden welcomed 27 wounded warriors at the White House today for the annual Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) Soldier Ride®. Soldier Ride is a nationally...

Jun 16, 2022

Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) today applauded the historic U.S. Senate passage of the SFC Heath Robinson Honoring Our PACT Act. The legislation will finally guarantee care and benefits for...

Jun 10, 2022

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (June 10, 2022) – Barriers to care delay treatment for veterans dealing with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). For wounded veterans, stigma can be one of the biggest...

Wounded Warrior Project Encourages Volunteerism at Harvest Hope Food Bank

COLUMBIA, S.C., Nov. 29, 2017 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) veterans and their family members answered the call for help from those in need by volunteering with Harvest Hope Food Bank. Volunteers fed the hungry across 20 South Carolina counties and helped their community by distributing food and offering emotional support to area residents this holiday season.

Wounded Warrior Project(R)

"Helping at a food bank is something I have wanted to do for a long time," said Laura Efrid, wife of an Army veteran, "but I was always unable to because of my schedule. It was a very rewarding experience and has me thinking about volunteering at a smaller local food bank." 

The gathering served as an opportunity for wounded warriors to connect with their community while feeling empowered through helping others.

"The highlight of the event was the instant camaraderie shared by the warriors and their family members," said Army veteran Steven Dobbs. "It was easy to give of our time when a quick bond forms and organizes the volunteers."

The warriors sorted and handed out squash donated by a local farmer and bagged plasticware, yogurt, and canned goods for people coming in to shop for their household needs. They also supported each other emotionally.

"I was talking to the spouse of a wounded warrior," Laura said. "She suddenly opened up to me and was so discouraged in her home life and dealing with her husband and his post-traumatic stress disorder. I shared some of my experiences, and it really helped her."

Harvest Hope distributed over 27.5 million meals last year and fed approximately 48,000 people a week. The food bank uses nearly 11,000 volunteers per year to keep operations running at their facilities.

"It could be me at these events," Steven said. "All of the mentally, physically, emotionally, and socially stigmatizing parts of me are completely normal when I'm in the presence of other warriors."

To learn and see more about how WWP's programs and services connect, serve, and empower wounded warriors, visit http://newsroom.woundedwarriorproject.org, and click on multimedia.

About Wounded Warrior Project
Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) connects, serves, and empowers wounded warriors. Read more at http://newsroom.woundedwarriorproject.org/about-us.

 

 

SOURCE Wounded Warrior Project

For further information: Rob Louis - Public Relations, Email: rlouis@woundedwarriorproject.org, Phone: 904.627.0432

Here are Wounded Warriors Social Links, if you want to share this page content on social media then select the media you would like to share to from the list below