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Nov 30, 2022

The U.S. Department of Labor recognized Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) as a 2022 HIRE Vets Platinum Medallion Award winner for being a veteran employer of choice. The HIRE Vets Medallion Program...

Nov 9, 2022

Join Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) as we honor the nation's veterans in our virtual Veterans Day Show premiering Friday, Nov. 11. The Veterans Day show, presented by DISH Network, will air on...

Oct 17, 2022

Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) today announced investments in 21 veterans and military service organizations as part of its effort to build a network of support for America's wounded veterans and...

Veterans Served by Wounded Warrior Project Share Their Service Dog Stories

JACKSONVILLE, Fla., Sept. 30, 2017 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Dogs are well-known as "man's best friend," but for some of America's service members, the bond goes much deeper. In celebration of National Dog Week, wounded veterans served by Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) shared their stories about their service dogs, how the dogs have helped them cope with the visible and invisible wounds of war, and some tips for owning a service dog.

In celebration of National Dog Week, wounded veterans served by Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) shared their stories about their service dogs.

Army veteran Dozer Reed and his service dog, Leyna

How does your service dog assist you?  
"My dog Leyna helps me on multiple fronts. For my mobility issues, she's acceptably defiant when she feels I am doing something I shouldn't. That happens frequently. She will bark to alert my family if my back locks up and I need assistance. For the other issues, she wakes me up when I'm having nightmares. She keeps a barrier around me in crowds or when walking. She distracts me when I get emotional or start to feel anxiety. Like any great dog, she loves me unconditionally. When I'm having a down day, she will cheer me up and get me back on that logical thought process. She's not great at talking, but that means she never lends her opinion unsolicited. On the flip side, she's a great listener."

Army veteran Angela Peacock and her service dog, GI Joe

What's the best way to discipline a dog?
"Positive reinforcement is by far the best way to discipline a dog. Dogs who are praised for the behavior the owner does want instead of being punished for bad behavior is the best way. When dogs know they will get a toy, treats, or love, they will do anything for you."

To read the rest of their stories, visit: http://newsroom.woundedwarriorproject.org/highlights?item=30745.

About Wounded Warrior Project
Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) connects, serves, and empowers wounded warriors. Read more at http://newsroom.woundedwarriorproject.org/about-us.

 

SOURCE Wounded Warrior Project

For further information: Mattison Brooks, Public Relations, Email: mbrooks@woundedwarriorproject.org, Phone: 904.451.5590

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