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Oct 27, 2021

WASHINGTON (Oct. 28, 2021) — Every day 44 new warriors and family members register for the no-cost services Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) provides. That’s in addition to the nearly 200,000...

Oct 27, 2021

As part of its ongoing investments in best-in-class partner organizations, Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) announced community partnership grants to 32 veteran and military service organizations....

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WASHINGTON (Oct. 20, 2021) – Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) today testified in support of veterans’ interests on a variety of legislation that was the subject of hearings before the U.S....

Wounded Warrior Project Families Make Connections, Unique Rustic Signs

JACKSONVILLE, Fla., May 23, 2017 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- When Kurt Wilson returns home later this month, he will be greeted by a sign that simply reads, "Home Sweet Home."

A recent Wounded Warrior Project event connected veteran family members during an afternoon of crafting unique plaques – each made by hand and from the heart – while sharing their experiences.

When David Medina goes to sleep each night, he will pass a wooden panel on the bedroom door that says, "For all the things my hands have held the best by far is you."

A recent Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) event connected warrior family members during an afternoon of crafting unique plaques – each made by hand and from the heart – while sharing their experiences.

Lymarie Medina's inspiration came from Andrew McMahon's song, "Cecilia and the Satellite" – and her husband, David, an Army veteran.

"I had my husband in mind when I made the plaque," she said. "I'm hanging it on the bedroom door. I want to remind him we have his hand. I'm going to put a collage of family pictures around it, so he will see the family that loves him. He needs that support every day."

WWP program events like making signs at Creative Grain Studio give family members of wounded warriors an opportunity to experience firsthand what is possible at social gatherings that connect them with one another and empower them to build a support structure.

The signs addressed the struggles for many WWP families as they try to reconnect. Jennifer Wilson's family is temporarily separated so she can set up a new home while Kurt remains out of state with their oldest son until he graduates from high school.

"I can't wait for it to really be a home sweet home," Jennifer said.

The group sized, refurbished, and painted planks of rustic wood before they added their own personal messages. Each sign reminded families while their struggles differ, they're all empowered by the resources available through WWP.  

The event was one of WWP's gatherings that educates warrior families about additional programs and services to help in the recovery process, creates support through shared experiences, and builds camaraderie by connecting injured veterans to one another and warrior families.

To learn and see more about how WWP's programs and services connect, serve, and empower wounded warriors, visit http://newsroom.woundedwarriorproject.org/, and click on multimedia.

About Wounded Warrior Project
Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) connects, serves, and empowers wounded warriors. Read more at http://newsroom.woundedwarriorproject.org/about-us.

 

SOURCE Wounded Warrior Project

For further information: Rob Louis - Public Relations, Email: RLouis@woundedwarriorproject.org, Phone: 904.627.0432