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Oct 11, 2021

JACKSONVILLE, Fla., Oct. 11, 2021 — Each year Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) hosts a special celebration to showcase warriors' transitions to civilian life and recognize supporters that honor...

Sep 29, 2021

Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) elected new leadership to its volunteer board of directors. Kathleen Widmer is assuming the role of board chair. Lt. Gen. (Ret.) Ken Hunzeker is now vice chair....

Sep 24, 2021

WASHINGTON (Sept. 24, 2021) – Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) applauds the U.S. House passage of legislation that would authorize construction of the Global War on Terrorism Memorial in the...

Veterans Relive Childhood Gaming Memories with Wounded Warrior Project

FRISCO, Texas, Feb. 10, 2017 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Injured veterans revisited their childhoods during a recent Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) connection event at the National Videogame Museum. As they toured displays and tested their skills at the arcade, warriors and guests experienced what is possible at social events that get them out of the house and connected with fellow military families.

Museum displays showcased the history of gaming from the 1970s through today. Music by Run DMC, Pat Benatar, and other artists added to the authenticity of each era's displays as warriors enjoyed sharing their pasts with their children.

"Every veteran I met that day had a smile from ear to ear," said Marine Corps veteran Daniel Razo. "Outings like this connect warriors who shared the same hobbies as kids."

"My husband and our boys love video games, so this was an amazing opportunity for us," said Erin Shock, whose husband, Jeremiah, is a Marine Corps veteran. "Getting Jeremiah out of the house and socializing with people who understand him has helped us connect more as a family."

Connection activities support the recovery needs of warriors by reintroducing them to the bonds experienced during military service. In a WWP survey of the injured warriors it serves, more than half of survey respondents (51.7 percent) talked with fellow veterans to address their mental health issues.

"Wounded Warrior Project events allow me to form strong relationships with other veterans," Daniel said. "We can share things from our past and plan for the future. This weekend, we're helping a military family move into their new home."

WWP programs help injured veterans with mental health, physical health and wellness, career and benefits counseling, and connecting with other warriors. Generous donors make it possible for wounded warriors to benefit from program resources at no cost.

"Wounded Warrior Project gives me a sense of brotherhood with fellow veterans," Daniel said. "I've added contacts to my cellphone through events like this. And we've all pledged to keep in contact, even if it's just a 'how have you been doing, buddy?' text."

To learn and see more about how WWP's programs and services connect, serve, and empower wounded warriors, visit http://newsroom.woundedwarriorproject.org/, and click on multimedia.

About Wounded Warrior Project
Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) connects, serves, and empowers wounded warriors. Read more at http://newsroom.woundedwarriorproject.org/about-us.

 

 

SOURCE Wounded Warrior Project

For further information: Rob Louis - Public Relations, Email: RLouis@woundedwarriorproject.org, Phone: 904.627.0432