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Homes FOR and FROM Veterans: 5 Latest WWP Efforts for Those in Need of Housing Assistance

Wounded Warrior Project is not known for building homes for veterans. And many people outside of WWP program alumni don’t know that WWP is one of the best sources of help to attain veteran housing assistance from a very complex system of DoD and VA benefits.

According to a 2016 U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) report, 39,471 veterans are homeless. Through veteran programs, volunteer efforts, and services, WWP diligently tries to provide housing opportunities for veterans in need. And as part of the process of healing, many wounded veterans feel it gives them a great sense of purpose to give back to other hurting veterans what helped them most.

Here are five recent examples where WWP veterans came together to give or receive housing help.

1. Home Benefit Loans for Veterans

Wounded Warrior Project teamed up with the United Home Loans of San Antonio to help veterans learn about the Veterans Affairs’ home loan benefits. Vets were able to gain helpful insight on how they could meet VA loan eligibility requirements to save money, build equity, and find a place to live.

2. Building Houses in Jacksonville Beach, Florida


Check out wounded warriors and veteran volunteers in action. View an interactive gallery and see how they helped build houses for veterans. Sometimes, you have to take matters into your own hands!

3. Injured Veterans Build a Home for a Family in Need

WWP veterans and Atlanta Habitat for Humanity® teamed up to build a home for a family in need. Veterans not only helped build a house through Atlanta Habitat but also gained an opportunity to connect with service men and women in their communities. Outreach programs for wounded veterans help warriors cope with the stress of combat while helping those in need.

4. Wounded Warriors Give Back to the Charleston Coastal Community

Learn how a group of injured service members built homes in Charleston and connected with veterans in their community. Through the WWP Alumni program, injured veterans were able to reach new brothers and sisters in arms while working together to help American citizens. Hear from WWP alumni, Brian Steele, and his experience building a home and the rehabilitative benefits of the WWP Alumni program.

5. Renovating a Home for a Veteran in Need

Wounded Warrior Project and Habitat for Humanity teamed up to accomplish a remarkable charitable act and renovated a donated home for an injured veteran in need. Bob Karlstrand, a Vietnam veteran diagnosed with terminal cancer, donated his home under the condition that it was given to another veteran. Bonnie Reyna-Berg, a retired Navy veteran, received the house and a group of vets from the WWP Alumni program came to renovate the property, but more importantly, their generosity and comradery helped turn the house into a home.  

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