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Warriors Connect During Rock Climbing with Veterans Charity

SAN DIEGO, July 3, 2018 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) recently gave warriors and their guests the opportunity to incorporate the exhilarating sport of indoor rock climbing in their physical fitness routines.

Wounded Warrior Project® recently gave warriors and their guests the opportunity to incorporate the exhilarating sport of indoor rock climbing in their physical fitness routines.

"I've always enjoyed rock climbing, but after I left the military, I hadn't had a chance to pick it back up again," said Navy veteran Christina Danley. "My oldest son loves to climb anything, so I thought it would be fun to do together. I enjoyed watching him have fun more than anything."

WWP connects warriors with one another, their families, and communities. It serves warriors through lifesaving programs and services targeting mental and physical health, career and benefits counseling, and support for the most severely wounded. And WWP empowers warriors to mentor other veterans and live life on their terms.  

A typical bouldering gym uses no ropes, and the walls are usually 10 to 14 feet tall. Although indoor rock climbing can be done alone, a group setting is preferred because peer support plays an important part in contributing to increased confidence and enjoyment while exercising and learning new skills.

"I spoke with a few warriors I met and saw some familiar faces," Christina said. "I hope to see them at other outdoor events like scuba diving or kayaking." 

WWP Physical Health and Wellness events are designed to connect warriors with training, skills, and techniques that empower them to reduce stress, combat depression, and live an overall healthy and active lifestyle.

"My husband and I are both veterans, and we've been part of Wounded Warrior Project since my husband retired," Christina said. "It has kept us sane and always gives us something to look forward to. We've been able to do so much with Wounded Warrior Project that we would not have been able to do on our own."

In a WWP survey (https://www.woundedwarriorproject.org/survey) of the injured warriors it serves, 30.3 percent of survey respondents expressed physical activity helps them cope with stress and emotional concerns. Programs like this highlight the importance of managing mental health through physical activity and connecting with other veterans.

To learn more, visit https://www.woundedwarriorproject.org/programs/physical-health-wellness.

About Wounded Warrior Project
WWP has been connecting, serving, and empowering wounded warriors for 15 years. To learn more, visit http://newsroom.woundedwarriorproject.org.

Wounded Warrior Project is recognizing 15 years of impactful programs and services. Independence Program helps seriously injured warriors live more meaningful lives. Learn more at woundedwarriorproject.org. (PRNewsfoto/Wounded Warrior Project)

SOURCE Wounded Warrior Project

For further information: Vesta Anderson - Public Relations, vanderson@woundedwarriorproject.org, 904.570.0771