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Wounded Warrior Project Statement on 2014 Midterm Elections

Washington, D.C. (November 5, 2014) – Today, with the 2014 midterm elections now behind us, Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) urges our lawmakers—both the current members of the 113th Congress and the incoming members of the 114th Congress—to reflect upon Washington’s long-standing commitment to our nation’s injured veterans, to consider the challenges they continue to face, and to seek bipartisan solutions that honor their service and sacrifice and prioritize their needs.       

There is much more work to do to meet President Lincoln’s call – and the Department of Veterans Affairs’ mandate – “to care for him who shall have borne the battle.” There can be no higher priority than to help our wounded veterans fully recover, readjust, and rehabilitate their lives.   

“The 113th Congress has had several legislative accomplishments related to veterans issues—especially in regard to the myriad of new policies within the bipartisan Veterans Access to Care Act of 2014—but much work remains,” said Steve Nardizzi, CEO of Wounded Warrior Project. “Just as many injured warriors are still on a road to full recovery, policymakers are still on a road toward closing gaps in care and access, and eliminating barriers that impede injured veterans’ recovery and reintegration.”

Reflecting the experience of injured veterans and their caregivers, WWP will continue to focus on four key policy priorities: 

1.Mental Health - Closing gaps and eliminating barriers to improved mental health for warriors and their families and caregivers (e.g., the Clay Hunt Suicide Prevention for American Veterans Act (H.R. 5059));

2.Economic Empowerment - Fostering the economic empowerment of wounded, ill, and injured veterans by eliminating educational and employment barriers (e.g., the Wounded Warrior Employment Improvement Act (H.R. 5032));

3.Long-term Rehabilitation and Caregivers - Helping guarantee access to optimal long-term rehabilitative care for wounded, ill, and injured veterans and necessary support for their caregivers (e.g., the Military and Veteran Caregiver Services Improvement Act of 2014 (S. 2243)); 

4.Wounded Warrior Programs - Improving the effectiveness of government programs established to help warriors and their families effectively reintegrate back into their communities (e.g., the Warriors’ Peer-Outreach Pilot Program Act (H.R. 3056)).

 

Echoing President Lincoln’s call, the mission of WWP is to honor and empower Wounded Warriors, and our vision is to foster the most successful, well-adjusted generation of wounded service members in our nation’s history. We look forward to working with both Congresses to achieve these vital policy priorities.

About Wounded Warrior Project

Wounded Warrior Project is recognizing its ten-year anniversary, reflecting on a decade of service and reaffirming its commitment to serving injured veterans for their lifetime. The mission of Wounded Warrior Project is to honor and empower Wounded Warriors. WWP currently serves over 59,000 warriors and nearly 8,500 family members through its 20 unique programs and services. The purpose of WWP is to raise awareness and to enlist the public’s aid for the needs of injured service members, to help injured servicemen and women aid and assist each other, and to provide unique, direct programs and services to meet their needs. WWP is a national organization headquartered in Jacksonville, Florida. To get involved and learn more, visit woundedwarriorproject.org.